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K-Laser – A Drug Free, Surgery-Free Solution

K-Laser – A Drug Free, Surgery-Free Solution

K-Laser – Because it hurts to see our pets hurting

Pets suffering from osteoarthritis, joint pain, tendinitis, muscle strains, puncture wounds may find relief with K-Laser therapy. Our veterinarians are specialty trained in laser therapy, and will screen your pets to determine if they’ll benefit from this therapy.

What is Laser Therapy?

Class IV K-Lasers deliver specific red and near-infrared wavelengths of laser light to induce a therapeutic effect within the body.  Some benefits are increased circulation, decreased swelling, pain relief and tissue repair. During treatment, infrared laser light interacts with tissue at the cellular level. Increased metabolic activity transports nutrients across the cell membrane.  This promotes the healing process and reduces pain.

It’s been used in Europe since the 1970’s, and the US Food & Drug Administration cleared it in 2002. Thousands of veterinarians prefer it to surgical options.

Additional Therapeutic Effects

The painless application of laser waves draw oxygen to the affected area, and therefore it creates an optimum healing environment. It also reduces inflammation and muscle spasm. As the injured area returns to normal, your pet returns to normal levels of activity and energy.  You’ll notice relief from stiffness and pain, and you’ll see increased in play, if you pet is playful.  If you have questions about the process, we’ll explain every step. Laser therapy was featured on ABC; see the video here.

How Long Before the Results are Noticed?

Some pets feel improvement after the first treatment, however others may require multiple treatments. Each session is cumulative, and results may not be achieved for 3 or 4 visits. It depends on the condition treated.  We don’t use K-Laser alone, instead, it’s part of a holistic treatment plan for overall health.  Your veterinarian may prescribe physical therapy, exercise, electrotherapy or massage to help improve mobilization.

Treatment requires no sedation or restraint, and our team keeps your pet comfortable and relaxed.  Over the many cases we’ve treated, we’ve rarely seen side effects reported. Occasionally, laser therapy aggravates some old injuries or pain syndromes briefly.  If you make an appointment to learn more, we won’t rush you to a decision.  Instead, we’ll help you select the best options for your pet’s health.  Call today.

Heartworm in Cats

Heartworm in Cats

Recommendations for heartworm are specific to your cat family

When and how often cats should be tested for heartworm infection is a matter of debate. In making the decision on when to test, we consider how common heartworm disease is where your live, and what heartworm preventive care your cats currently receive. We also consider your pets’ environment and the mosquito season in Chicago.

Heartworm in Cats

Cats should be tested before they are started on a heartworm preventive. Experts do not agree on how often a cat that is taking a preventive should be tested, however, it would be based on risk of exposure and consistency of administering preventives. Our experienced veterinary team can weigh all the considerations for your pet, and help you decide what is best for your pet.

Control of Intestinal Parasites

Keeping your scheduled annual exam is a gift to your cat. As with vaccinations and heartworm testing, you’ll find different opinions on when or if fecal examinations should be performed. You’ll hear a wide variety of advice on when or if cats should receive regular deworming.  Our recommendations are based on circumstances as follows.

  • The age of your pet
  • Likelihood your pets have been exposed to feces from other animals
  • Evidence your pet suffers from fleas
  • Whether your breed is a hunting breed
  • The kind of preventive, if any your pet currently receives
  • A history of infection
  • Your breeding plans
  • How your children interact with your pets

Considerations for Kittens

Because prenatal infections do not occur in kittens, initiate treatment at 3 weeks; repeat at 5, 7, and 9 weeks of age, and then put on a monthly heartworm preventive that also controls intestinal parasites. Using a year-round heartworm preventive/intestinal parasite combination product decreases the risk of parasites.

Managing Adult Cats

If on a year-round heartworm preventive/intestinal parasite combination product, have a fecal test performed 1-2 times per year and treat appropriately. If not on a year-round heartworm preventive/intestinal parasite combination product, have a fecal test performed 2-4 times per year and treat appropriately. Also monitor and eliminate parasites in pet’s environment.

Heartworms in Kitten - Heatlhcare at AuburnNewly Acquired Cats and Kittens

Auburn Animal Hospital Family believes in deworming immediately, after 2 weeks, and then following the above recommendations. We recommend new pet owners obtain the history of deworming of their pets and contact us to determine if additional treatment is needed.

Roundworms and hookworms of your pet can cause serious disease in people, especially children who may not have good hygiene habits. Treating them for worms is important for your pet’s health as well as your family’s.  Visit us to get detailed directions on how to manage the pets you love.

We strongly advise owners to make sure your pets have an annual fecal examination performed. Fecal examinations are advantageous. They reveal immediately whether your cat has intestinal parasites. If so, you may need to change their environment and access to other animals. You will also know what type of parasites are present. In that case, the proper medication will be selected to kill all of them at once.

A visit to Auburn will save you time, money and the stress of caring for your pet alone. With thanks to Pet Education.com

Heartworm and Intestinal Parasites

Heartworm and Intestinal Parasites

Recommendations for heartworm are specific to your pet family

When and how often pets should be tested for heartworm infection is a matter of debate. In making a decision on when to test, we consider how common heartworm disease is where your pets live, and what heartworm preventive pets currently receive.  We also consider your pets’ environment and the mosquito season in Chicago.

Heartworm in Dogs

The American Heartworm Society (AHS) suggests all adult dogs be tested at the time a heartworm preventive is started.  Then, your dogs should be tested annually for heartworm infection. In the past, if a dog had been on preventive methods routinely, it was not considered necessary to test every year.  Instead, AHS called for testing only every two to three years.  However, when reports showed an increase in animals contracting the disease, AHS made a change.  Now, they recommend a more aggressive testing routine.

We also find it can be difficult to document when an animal hasn’t been checked in three years. Therefore, annual testing ensures that infection is caught in plenty of time to manage it effectively.

Heartworm in Cats

Cats should be tested before they are started on a heartworm preventive. Experts do not agree on how often a cat that is taking a preventive should be tested, however, it would be based on risk of exposure and consistency of administering preventives.  Our experienced veterinary team can weigh all the considerations for your particular pet, and help you decide what is best for your pet.

Control of Intestinal Parasites

Keeping your scheduled annual exam is a gift to your dog.As with vaccinations and heartworm testing, you’ll find different opinions on when or if fecal examinations should be performed. You’ll hear a wide variety of advice on when or if dogs and cats should receive regular “dewormings.” Our recommendations on testing and worming will be on circumstances such as below.

  • The age of your pet
  • Likelihood your pets have been exposed to feces from other animals
  • Evidence your pet suffers from fleas
  • Whether your breed is a hunting breed
  • The kind of preventive, if any your pet currently receives
  • A history of infection
  • Your breeding plans
  • How your children interact with your pets

Regular deworming is recommended by the American Association of Veterinary Parasitologists (AAVP), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and the Companion Animal Parasite Council (CAPC).

Considerations for Kittens

Because prenatal infections do not occur in kittens, initiate treatment at 3 weeks; repeat at 5, 7, and 9 weeks of age, and then put on a monthly heartworm preventive that also controls intestinal parasites. Using a year-round heartworm preventive/intestinal parasite combination product decreases the risk of parasites.

Considerations for Puppies

Initiate treatment at 2 weeks; repeat at 4, 6, and 8 weeks of age, and then put on a monthly heartworm preventive that also controls intestinal parasites. Using a year-round heartworm preventive/intestinal parasite combination product decreases the risk of parasites. If not using such a product, worm at 2, 4, 6, and 8 weeks of age and then monthly until 6 months of age.

Nursing Dams – We treat at the same time as kittens and puppies

Managing Adult Cats and Dogs

If on a year-round heartworm preventive/intestinal parasite combination product, have a fecal test performed 1-2 times per year and treat appropriately. If not on a year-round heartworm preventive/intestinal parasite combination product, have a fecal test performed 2-4 times per year and treat appropriately. Also monitor and eliminate parasites in pet’s environment.

Newly Acquired Animals

Auburn Animal Hospital Family 2Worm immediately, after 2 weeks, and then follow above recommendations.  We recommend new pet owners obtain the “deworming” history of their pets and contact us to determine if additional treatment is needed.

Roundworms and hookworms of your pet can cause serious disease in people, especially children who may not have good hygiene habits.  Treating them for worms is important for your pet’s health as well as your family’s.  Visit us to get detailed directions on how to manage your special pets.

We strongly advise owners to make sure your pets have an annual fecal examination performed. Fecal examinations are advantageous. By having a fecal examination performed, you will know if your pet has intestinal parasites. If so, you may need to change their environment and access to other animals. You will also know what type of parasites are present. In that case, the proper medication will be selected to kill all of them at once.

A visit to Auburn will save you time, money and the stress of caring for your pet alone.  With thanks to Pet Education.com

Vaccinations for Cats

Vaccinations for Cats

How often should my cats receive vaccinations?

You may have heard about the current controversies regarding cat vaccinations. Some researchers believe we do not need to vaccinate annually for most diseases.  But how often we should vaccinate for each specific disease in adult animals has not yet been determined. We do not know how long the protection from a vaccine lasts. It may be 5 years for one disease and 3 years for another. For still others, vaccinations may last less than 2 years.

Almost all researchers agree that we need to continue to give at least three combination vaccinations, and repeat these at one year of age. They also agree that rabies vaccinations should continue to be given.

cat vaccinations are important to healthy cat lifestyle.Against what diseases are we protecting?

Experts agree on which vaccines are ‘core’ vaccines, i.e., what vaccines should be given to every cat, and what vaccines are given only to certain cats (non-core). Whether to vaccinate with non-core vaccines depends upon a number of things.  Age, breed, and health status of the cat all impact our recommendation for vaccinations.  We also consider potential exposure of the cat to other pets that could carry disease, the type of vaccine, and our geographical area.

Types of Vaccines

In cats, the suggested core vaccines are feline panleukopenia (distemper), feline viral rhinotracheitis, feline calici virus, and rabies.

The American Association of Feline Practitioners (AAFP) recommends vaccinating against feline panleukopenia (distemper), feline viral rhinotracheitis, and feline calici virus every three years. But they also suggest that cats at a high risk of exposure to these diseases may benefit from more frequent vaccinations. There are now one year and three year combination vaccines and rabies vaccines available for cats. The decision to use either a one year vaccine versus a three year vaccine must be made by each cat owner. Consult with your veterinarian to determine what is best for your cat.

The non-core vaccines include feline leukemia (FeLV), feline infectious peritonitis (FIP), ringworm, and chlamydia.  We suggest all kittens receive an initial FeLV vaccination series and also a booster at one year of age. That’s because they are your most susceptible pets, and their lifestyles often change. The AAFP recommends that only adult cats with risk of exposure to FeLV continue to receive the FeLV vaccine. FIP and ringworm vaccinations are not recommended. The choice to use a chlamydia vaccine is based upon the prevalence of the disease and husbandry conditions.

If you have any questions about vaccinating your cat, as us during the annual exam. We’ll help you make the best decision for your breed and family.

Healthy Pet Care

Healthy Pet Care

Your healthy pet needs care, too.

At Auburn, we understand. You and your family want to enjoy a healthy pet as long as you possibly can.  After all, your pets are active, loving members of your family.  Pets also have biological systems as complex as our own.  That’s why it’s so important to have a relationship with a caring veterinarian, one who offers as much concern as they do veterinary science expertise.

Your knowledge of your pet’s warning signals is the key to avoiding serious problems in the future. So, we make sure you’re learning more with every visit.

We offer a full range of healthy pet services, including affordable wellness care plans and packages to keep your pet healthier longer.  We love your pets almost as much as you do.  You’ll always get a warm welcome at Auburn, and in no time at all you’ll find your whole family is comfortable and knowledgeable about the health of your pets.

Healthy pet care includes attention to the following.

  • Full system physical examinations
  • Vaccinations
  • Neutering and spays
  • Flea and parasite protection
  • Preventative blood panel
  • Heart worm test and urinalysis
  • Allergy care

Learn more about our annual physicals here.

Digital X-Ray

Digital X-Ray

We have the latest technology in veterinary imaging

Digital radiology is state of the art technology that provides quicker, clearer and safer x-ray imaging.  We’re one of the few veterinary hospitals that offer this advanced service.  Radiographs or x-rays help us evaluate the size and shape of the internal organs in the chest and abdomen of your pet.  Digital x-rays also help us evaluate the skeletal structure.  If you suspect your pet may have ingested a foreign object, timely digital radiology could be the difference between life and death.  Because of digital x-ray, Auburn veterinarians run accurate tests in less time. This reduces radiation exposure and discomfort to your pet.  We’re sensitive to keep your pet as relaxed as possible during the exam, and we’ll keep you informed as well.

Digital x-ray can uncover hidden problems

We have a combined 50 years of experience among our veterinarian team.  We can often recognize life-threatening illnesses that may have gone undetected before your visit.  Pets can’t always tell us when they’re hurting.  Digital x-ray gives us the key information we need to keep your pet healthier longer.

Our staff is trained in advanced procedures, including pneumocystogram (air contrast study of the bladder),  barium administration and study, and skull and nasal studies.

Dental Health Services

Dental Health Services

Oral and dental disease is the most frequently diagnosed health problem for cats.  The dental health of cats and dogs can effect every aspect of their health.  Here’s a review of a few dental health facts for cats.

Dental Health Facts for Cats

Kittens have 26 temporary teeth that begin to erupt at about two to three weeks of age. Adult cats have 30 permanent teeth that start to erupt at about 3-4 months of age.

A cat’s incisors (the small teeth at the front of the mouth) are used for picking up food and grooming.  Cat canines (the large pointed teeth) are used for grabbing prey.  The molars (teeth at the back of the mouth) are used for crushing and tearing food. Unlike human molars which have a flatter surface, cat molars are pointed- signifying they are truly obligate carnivores. Cat tongues are covered in small “hairs” called papillae that are used for grooming.

Cats infected with FeLV or FIV commonly have dental disease. We recommend knowing your cat’s status.  We can test for this at your next visit.

Dental Health Facts for Dogs

Puppies have 28 temporary teeth, 14 in the upper jaw and 14 in the lower jaw. These deciduous teeth erupt at about three to four weeks of age.  Dogs have 42 permanent teeth, 20 on the top, and 22 on the bottom. These begin to emerge at about four months of age.

Studies show that by age three, 80 percent of dogs exhibit signs of gum disease.  Puppies should lose a puppy tooth before the corresponding adult tooth emerges.  If a puppy tooth is still in place when an adult tooth begins to show it is called a retained deciduous teeth. If this occurs, make an appointment at Auburn right away so the dog’s occlusion is not affected.

Signs of poor oral and dental health:

  • Bad Breath.
  • Change in eating or chewing habits or changes in appetite
  • Pawing at face or mouth or drooling
  • Sensitivity to having the mouth area touched

Pets sometimes show no outward signs of advanced dental disease but on physical exam shows gingivitis, periodontal disease, missing teeth, broken teeth or lesions may be noted by our veterinarians.  That’s why it’s important to have a relationship with a veterinary hospital that really cares the way we do at Auburn.

Grooming Services

Grooming Services

We offer full-service grooming, including general brush outs, shaving mats, expression of anal glands, and more below…

Mini Spa Treatment

This grooming package includes an overall brushing, nail trim, ear and eye wipe out.  Grooming can uncover other health issues that need your attention.

Shave Mats

It can be dangerous to use scissors to cut out mats, because the skin is often very close to the mat.  It’s easy to accidentally cut your pet’s skin with scissors when trying to cut out a mat.  Therefore, repair for this type of laceration requires general anesthesia, sutures, and sometimes antibiotics. If your pet has a mat in its fur, we recommend having it shaved with our professional clippers.

Hind End Quarter Trim/ Sani Trim

Sometimes cats have a hard time keeping their hind ends sanitary.  So, we make it easier by  trimming the fur with the use of our clippers.  Those trims make it easier for them to maintain their hygiene, and makes it less likely for fecal material to adhere to the fur.

Lion Cut Shave

The lion cut shave is our most popular form of grooming.  That’s when fur is shaved all over the body of the dog or cat until they resemble a lion.  A ‘mane” is left around the face, a puff of fur remains on the tail and “boots” of fur remain around all the feet.

Nail Trims

We offer complimentary nail trims with grooming services as a courtesy to our clients. We also do nail trims separate from examinations for a small fee- these can be scheduled at your convenience during business hours.

Auburn requires that all patients undergoing any grooming service be up to date on vaccinations and has been seen our veterinarians within one year.  If you haven’t seen us in a while, we’re happy to schedule both when you call.   Don’t miss out on grooming or health checks for your pet.